Just a German Girl in London: 32 Great Reasons to Move Abroad #livingabroad

MyNutShare - Just a German Girl in London - Living Abroad
MyNutShare – Just a German Girl in London – Living Abroad

Thanks everybody for your great and positive feedback to my latest blog post You are so lucky to live in London. Here are some reasons why I think  it’s great to live abroad or travel as much as you can.

  1. You get to know yourself very well.
  2. You’ll stretch your mind because you continuously have to get out of your comfort zone
  3. You’ll experience a lot of challenges. This is tough. But when you achieve to manage those you will feel soooooo, soooooo good
  4. You’ll find pleasure on little things that you wouldn’t have thought to matter
  5. You’ll see, eat, experience continuously new things and everyday life can become pretty exciting
  6. You’ll miss home and learn to be grateful
  7. You’ll figure out who are the friends that love you and are there for you (of course, vice versa) no matter the distance
  8. You can receive parcels from home and exchange parcels, which is a great thing to do
  9. You’ll meet new people
  10. You’ll realise that a lot of people do have exactly the same experiences as you and therefore new friendships can sometimes build on a more intense basis – similarities connect
  11. You’ll feel home on more places than just ‘home’
  12. Heimat becomes something special – you will become sentimental and sometimes homesick but to head ‘home’ to see your loved gets you excited as a child on christmas
  13. You’ll relax  – you’ll have the chance to step back from expectations, cultural norms and figure out what you truly want
  14. Therefore you will become more independent and value more your own decision-making skills
  15. You can restart in a certain way – no one knows you anyway so you don’t have to deal with expectations or stereotypes
  16. You’ll have a lot tourist moments in the city / country you live in because you absorb things differently. When I lived in Germany I actually haven’t traveled too much within the country or did a lot of sightseeing within the cities I lived in, because I always felt I could do it later. But living abroad – especially if it’s for a limited time only, will create a certain sense of urgency to do so
  17. Your language skills will progress incredibly – simply because you have no other choice
  18. Distances will no longer matter that much
  19. You’ll become proud of your cultural ID while also …
  20. … growing into another culture. The world becomes your home.
  21. You’ll become more aware of cultural differences and learn to appreciate them
  22. You’ll learn so much by having friends from all over the world
  23. You’ll realise when talking to tourists how much you have learned – i.e. London transportation and the tube map and a lot of other things
  24. You can do whatever you want (of course, just the legal stuff) and many people wouldn’t even care as it’s more anonymous
  25. You’ll learn how to ask for help …
  26. … and while doing so get more confident in not having the perfect language skills
  27. Especially when you relocate or travel with a limited amount of luggage you’ll declutter and simplify your life.
  28. You’ll learn to focus more on collection of moments rather than clutter and stuff
  29. You’ll anyways find loads of cute stuff you want to take with you
  30. You’ll realise that things you are good at can be totally challenging because you don’t understand a word (i.e. for me an aerobics class) – and you’ll be so proud of yourself when you manage to participate anyways
  31. You’ll be surprised how people from different countries think about your home country and you’ll create great memories. I gonna share my favourite example with you. A friend of mine from Taiwan was totally surprised when I had a salat because she believed that Germans just eat sausages and meat.
  32. You’ll have conversations about things you would never think you could have a serious conversation about and you’ll totally enjoy it. And let’s be honest it’s great to get to know everything about other cultures when it’s shared from locals

What else do you think makes the adventure ‘living abroad’ so worthy? Let me know – either in the comments or drop me a message.

Lots of love,

Steph xx

Just a German Girl in London: ‘You are so lucky to live in London’ #livingabroad

Hello everybody,

today’s post is going to be a bit critical. So, if you are not in the mood for that please skip this article, stop reading here and switch over to Buzzfeed to watch some cute kitty videos. Otherwise, please feel free to read my post of living abroad and the meaning of LUCK in this case. Many of you probably know that I live in London since 1.5 years. I pretty often hear ‘you are so lucky’.

Google defines luck as the ‘success or failure apparently brought by chance rather than through one’s one actions’ and being lucky as ‘having, bringing, or resulting from good luck’.

Well, I do not want to deny that I’m a lucky gal however, does living abroad really has a lot do to with luck? Or is it more a decision you decide to make? An action you take? Can’t the most of us simply decide to relocate to another country themselves? Fact is, the reason why I first started thinking of relocating to London was because I met a fabulous man who already lived in London when we first met. Well, things gotten more serious and after more than a year we felt an urgency to live in the same country. So, yes, I am lucky as it seems that I found my Mr. Right, I am lucky because I could experience the city on probation before finally relocating, I am lucky because I did not have to start a new life in a new country totally alone. On the other side – there were lots of moments beforehand where no one would have considered myself as lucky. We invested a whole bunch of money every months to make this relationship work, to pay flight tickets etc. Some of my friends asked me ‘How can you have a relationship with a man living in another country?’ ‘Why are you doing this?’ ‘You can’t know whether this will work out’ ‘You are going to quit your safe job to relocate and restart?’. At the beginning no one really thought I’d be that lucky – except I got some flower sent to my office. So, why do we judge people’s state of luck? Why do we assume? Why do we impose our beliefs on others  rather than support our each other?

I guess one of the main reasons this happens is that most people do not want to take actions as it’s quite inconvenient. The status-quo is so much better known. It’s tough to push your own boundaries and it’s scary to move abroad. But I believe it’s worth it. I believe the fear of failure, the fear of whatsoever hinders us way to often. And I can totally get that. I think everyone has certain fears in parts of his / her life and if you do not wanna relocate than travelling is a great alternative to get to know different cultures, to open up a bit and experience new things. While keeping everything else the way it is. However, let me warn you: travel can change your views, beliefs and yourself.

Source: Internet
Source: Internet

Another reason why I kicked off this ‘living abroad series’ is that a lot of people seem to believe that living abroad implies everyday being more fabulous than a unicorn farting rainbows, that all your everyday worries no longer exist. Where does this believe comes from? People living abroad do have everyday worries – a lot of them. I would admit we might have even a couple of more of them as everyday routines are getting shaken up, we have to communicate in another language and probably no clue where the heck we find any information about stuff we would easily know in our home country.

To just clear up things a bit I will go in the next posts deeper in what it means to live abroad, the perks and little struggles you suddenly have to face, the moments you feels lost and the moments you feel more alive then ever before.

I am more than happy to do a Q&A about the whole topic, so please feel free to drop me your questions. Lots of love, Steph xx