8 Golden Rules for Successful Recruiting

Be the expert

  • Know the industry you are operating in.
  • Know your customer and the company you are recruiting for.
  • Know the job you are recruiting for.
  • Know the candidate.

Be professional

  • Dress and behave appropriately.
  • Have a professional first impression management.
  • Remember: You are representing the company you work for, your client and the candidate.

Be honest, integer and human

  • Remember: You deal with human beings – you are not selling insurances.
  • Build trust and be normal. This does not mean to be ‘best friends’ with everybody but to give clear advise, be honest if you think this is not a good match and be emotional intelligent.

Create a great, but at least a good, experience

  • Again, you are representative for the company and the brand, remember that.
  • Give clear advice on how the process will be, how long it will take and keep to those milestones.
  • When you say you’ll be on touch on monday morning be in touch on monday morning. When you say you’ll send the details immediately, do it.

Provide feedback – always

  • Do it!
  • Especially when the match is not good and the journey will end there for the candidate: tell them! Communicate!
  • The same regarding the company side: be honest if you can’t find a great candidate immediately. Give feedback about your process and ensure you are hustling to make it happen.

Manage expectations

  • Be clear and honest about what to expect.
  • If you are recruiting for a temp position where there is  probably no option to stay is given – tell your candidates. This makes is easier for them as well as for you, in case you would need to end a contract.
  • If you get asked what salary would be appropriately and realistic – manage expectations. You are the expert who knows the market and the industry.

Be efficient

  • Don’t waist time – not your own time but also not your candidates’ or clients’ time.
  • When you know this would not be a match – be open and honest. There is literally no point for the candidate to come out to your place and waist his / her time on the preparation, commute, and thoughts.
  • Keep the processes smooths, stick to communicated milestones and make it a great experience.

Manage relationships (operational and strategic)

  • Remember: you deal with people.
  • Actively manage your relationships – don’t just let things happen – take action and responsibility.
  • Especially candidates that might not be a perfect fit right now could become potential clients over time and / or somewhere else. You will get your foot so much easier through their door when you did well in the first time.

 

Poor Performance – Beyond Lacking Ability and Motivation

Howdy,

in recent posts I talked about talent, potential and performance. As it has been said already job performance occurs in different stages and with different focus (task performance etc.). To see my other posts around this idea please check the category ‘talent’. Business Dictionary defines performance as ‘The accomplishment of a given task measured against present known standards of accuracy, complexness, cost and speed. In a contract, performance is deemed to be the fulfilment of an obligation in a manner that releases the performer from all liabilities under the contract’.

Well, this definition is quite technically and heavily focussing on task performance – how to perform in executing one task. Further research findings around ‘performance’ were pretty often in line with the model of MindTools – developed from ‘Developing Managament Skills’ by Whetten & Cameron, 2011. This model states:

Performance = Ability x Motivation

With ability being defined as a ‘person’s aptitude, as well as the training & resources supplied by the organisation’ and motivation defined as the ‘product of desire and commitment’.

Facts are:

  1. Ability and motivation are definitely important factors of performance.
  2. Performance is an absolutely essential measure of each company – no matter the company’s size.
  3. Individual’s performance can impact organisational performance.
  4. Many companies prefer focusing on good performance rather than negative performance.

Ability and motivation are important and regarding the fact that many companies are not keen or don’t have the financial resources to focus on too much employee development and training it is essential that abilities and motivation are in place. However, I don’t think this can’t be it. During selection processes we focus mainly on ‘who to select (in)’ – who is the right match for our company / role – whom to pick.

But when we review the impact individuals performance has on a whole team or even organisation shouldn’t we focus more on the parts that trigger poor or even negative performance? Shouldn’t these factors be at least as important as the ‘good’ factors? Shouldn’t we also focus on who to ‘select-out’? Whom to let go?

HR Zone states that good performance does occur on 3 levels:

  1. Relationships between individuals and their boss
  2. Relationships between individuals and their team
  3. Relationships between individuals and their wider organisation

I absolutely like this wider idea of performance. As it does say a lot about the underlying behaviours that form the relationships. Behaviour and soft skills are somehow developable as well as ability is somehow trainable and flexible. Motivation can somehow be increased through external factors like money and other rewards. But shouldn’t we focus on what motivates an individual from the insight? What are the internal motivators? Where does intrinsic motivation comes from? What are the underlying personality traits that form the person’s behaviour, thinking style and finally motivates a person?

In all these definitions above I miss the personality part of performance. Especially the parts that could lead to derailment and contra productive work behaviour which definitely can impact performance – negatively. The relationship levels give a first, nice indication about how people behave in contact with others but to get a real picture of this they must already be employed.

One of my favourite books  is ‘Why CEO’s Fail: The 11 Behaviours That Can Derail Your Climb to The Top & How to Manage Them’ by Dotlich & Cairo (2003). CEO’s who are obvisouly top performers by definition – how else could they have climbed up to the company’s top – are mainly not failing because of lacking ability or motivation. CEO’s mainly fail because of derailment, contra productive workplace behaviour. The  11 described behaviours like e.g. arrogance, mischievousness,  and perfectionism are formed by underlying maladaptive personality traits. Let’s just summarise – an individual’s performance can influence the performance of the whole company. How big also could be the potential damage when a CEO is not performing appropriately but is rather performing bad? Not bad in the definition of not hitting targets or not setting a vision but in influencing others negatively? Shouldn’t we focus, besides ability and motivation, on personality too? Personality traits are stable and unchangeable. This means we can’t change them with training or development. Shouldn’t we pay more attention to ‘whom select out’ in our selection processes rather than ‘who has the ability and motivation to perform’? Isn’t personality a main factor? Aren’t people the most valuable asset of each company? Aren’t people the ones who interact with your customers and who sell your products? So, why is the measurement of so called ‘maladaptive workplace behaviour’ not mandatory in selection processes?  So many companies use psychometrics like personality testing for their early stage selection process but focus in doing so mainly on the desirable traits they would like to select in rather the negative traits they would like to select out. Quite a few companies are not happy to admit that they do have low performers and are less happy to take action. I guess this is something that should be changed. What are your thoughts about this topic? How do you measure performance? I’m absolutely keen to get to know your view.

 

What is Talent?

Well, here we go. My first blog post! Whoop whoop.

Probably since McKinsey consultants introduced  the term ‘The War for Talent’ in 1997 most people understood that ‘Talent’ is considered to be something awesome. Especially companies and HR within them are keen to find the best talents on the market and to win them. Fair enough! But what exactly is talent? Which talent do you need?

Fact is, there is until now, year 2015 – 18 years later – NO universal established definition of talent. Wikipedia for example states ‘Talent means the skill that someone has quite naturally to do something that is hard’.  Innovation Excellence defines talent as something we cannot acquire and ‘we cannot learn to be talented’.  Business Dictionary gives two definitions for talent. ‘1. A natural ability to excel at a duty or an action’ and ‘2. A group of people, such as employees, who have a particular aptitude for certain tasks’. OK so this means in those context we assume that talent is something we cannot develop but which is naturally given.

So, this would mean talent is given and as a HR person you would need to find that person with the talent that you need for your special task to be fulfilled. Sounds pretty challenging. And would the talented person even know that he or she is talented? Would a natural talent always beat hard work?

I’m not too sure with all these definitions. Shouldn’t we more think about

  1. Is the talent a ‘raw’ talent or has the person already taken any action to build on his or her talent to grow and strengthen it?
  2. What if a naturally talented person is lazy? Would a less talented person but with a high strive to perform be a better alternative?
  3. Are we really searching for talent or are we searching for potential?

Whatever talent might be I guess we should take into account that our world is changing constantly and we should be forearmed for future challenges. And without any doubt is our workforce the most important asset and value of each company.

I hope this may be some good food for thought. I am keen to hear your view!

Stephanie